America's Hidden History | Phyllis Wheatley and Francis Scott Key | TBN

America's Hidden History | Phyllis Wheatley and Francis Scott Key

Watch America's Hidden History | Phyllis Wheatley and Francis Scott Key
September 19, 2019
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America's Hidden History

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America's Hidden History | Phyllis Wheatley and Francis Scott Key

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  • (dramatic music)
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  • - [Narrator] Modern historians have revised, rewritten,
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  • and even deleted entire chapters of American history.
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  • So what are we missing?
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  • What happened to the history that didn't make the books?
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  • Join historian David Barton, Tim Barton, and special guests
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  • as they uncover the facts some historians
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  • don't want you to know.
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  • This is America's Hidden History.
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  • (inspiring music)
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  • (electronic beeping)
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  • (seagulls calling) (waves lapping)
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  • We're along the coast of Massachusetts
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  • just south of Boston.
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  • And this is where the story kind of unfolds for us.
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  • The individual we're looking at now is Phyllis Wheatley.
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  • Phyllis Wheatley was actually brought to America as a slave.
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  • In fact, these very waters beside us
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  • are where slave ships would have come in early America.
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  • Phyllis Wheatley is from Senegal, Africa.
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  • When she was only a child she was captured
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  • by a neighboring tribe, the chief takes her,
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  • and the chief sells her into slavery.
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  • Well, the slave ship comes from Africa to America
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  • at that point.
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  • And you can imagine, if she's six, she's seven, she's eight,
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  • whatever it is, she's separated from her family.
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  • She's taken, she's put on a slave ship,
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  • she makes what's arguably a several-month journey
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  • from Africa getting over to the New World.
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  • And when she arrives in the New World,
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  • as terrifying as it is,
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  • she's put on slave blocks to be sold.
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  • And you can imagine being a young child on a slave block.
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  • You're in a nation you've never even heard about before,
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  • they're speaking a language you don't understand,
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  • you don't have a clue what's going on,
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  • and you're being sold somehow.
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  • Well, there was a man named John Wheatley
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  • who was there at that sale
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  • and he saw that young girl and he bought her, actually.
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  • He bought her for his family.
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  • She came over on a slave ship named Phyllis,
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  • so they named her Phyllis 'cause they had no clue
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  • what her name was, she couldn't speak their language,
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  • they didn't speak hers.
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  • They named her Phyllis, and because the Wheatleys bought her
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  • she became Phyllis Wheatley.
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  • (inspiring music)
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  • (electronic beeping)
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  • (inspiring music)
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  • We're at the Boston Women's Memorial
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  • and there are several women that are honored here.
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  • One of those women is Phyllis Wheatley.
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  • Now, after Phyllis was purchased by the Wheatley family
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  • they bring her home
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  • and decide they want to help educate her.
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  • Now, it was not totally unusual for a household slave
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  • to receive some level of education,
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  • but how much education Phyllis got was very unusual.
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  • The Wheatleys had a daughter,
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  • and they instructed the daughter,
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  • "We want you to help teach her English,"
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  • because she's come from Africa,
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  • doesn't speak any English whatsoever.
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  • So they begin teaching her English,
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  • actually using the Bible to do so,
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  • which does become significant in her story later.
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  • Well, after she begins learning English, learning the Bible,
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  • they're also teaching her Latin,
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  • they're also teaching her mathematics and science
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  • and all the kind of things
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  • that you would imagine you learn in education.
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  • And so they give her a very well-rounded education.
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  • Well, they discover she's a very quick learner.
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  • She is a very smart, bright young lady.
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  • They see the way she's mastered the English language,
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  • the vernacular, and they begin showing her how poetry works.
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  • So she begins writing poetry.
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  • At the age of 12, actually one of her poems was published
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  • in a paper which is huge
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  • because this is a black slave girl
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  • who is getting poetry published in a paper.
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  • At the age of 14 she has more poetry published.
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  • This is a really big deal
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  • because this is not the norm in America,
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  • it's not the norm for slave girls.
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  • But yet, this is what Phyllis Wheatley was doing
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  • as just a 12, 13, and 14-year-old.
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  • And think about how remarkable that is
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  • because she's come here when she was six or seven or eight,
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  • somewhere in that vicinity, didn't speak any English,
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  • and now, in just a few years
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  • she has not only mastered the English language,
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  • she's mastered it to the point
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  • to where she's doing poetry and prose and rhyming.
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  • And a lot of people who have lived here their whole life
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  • can't do poetry.
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  • So here's this young girl doing this,
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  • and she had so much content from which to choose
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  • on this poetry.
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  • I mean, think about the time in which she lived.
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  • We're leading up to the American War for Independence,
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  • so there's a lot of stuff going on
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  • with America and Great Britain.
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  • For example, here in 1765 the King imposed the Stamp Act
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  • which was a tax that they really protested and objected to.
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  • Well, he ends up repealing the Stamp Act.
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  • When he did, Phyllis actually wrote a poem
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  • praising King George III for repealing the Stamp Act.
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  • And then as other things come to light
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  • and you start hearing about this guy in Pennsylvania
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  • that's named Ben Franklin, and he's taken a leadership role.
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  • And so she does a poem about Ben Franklin,
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  • which is a really cool poem, and he really liked it.
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  • And then she hears about this guy from Virginia
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  • who has now been named Commander in Chief
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  • of all the military forces, a guy named George Washington.
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  • Well, she does a poem about George Washington,
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  • it ends up in his hands, he really likes it.
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  • He contacts her and said, "I'd really like to meet you."
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  • And so they set up a meeting.
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  • And they end up meeting at a house in Cambridge
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  • which is not far from here.
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  • (inspiring music)
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  • (electronic beeping)
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  • (inspiring music)
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  • We're at the house in Cambridge where Phyllis Wheatley
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  • came and performed her poetry for George Washington.
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  • Now, the house today is not just known
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  • as the Washington House,
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  • it's actually known as the Longfellow House
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  • because many years after the Revolution
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  • there was a guy named Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
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  • who was a famous American poet.
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  • He actually came and purchased this house.
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  • And this is where he lived for many years.
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  • But back up, 1775, Washington is here with many officers.
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  • They're here roughly nine months
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  • during what's known as the Siege of Boston.
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  • Yeah, the Siege of Boston happened
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  • because of the Shot Heard Around the World,
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  • the first conflict in the American War for Independence.
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  • There was the Battle of Lexington.
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  • That same day you had the Battle of Concord.
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  • Later that day you had the battle on the road to Boston.
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  • And so the British are out now.
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  • We see clearly they're fighting Americans now.
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  • They're back in Boston, they've taken Boston,
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  • and Bostonians want their town back.
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  • And so what happens is they form all these little militias
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  • and these groups.
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  • And groups come in from Vermont and New Hampshire
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  • and other places to help them fight the British.
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  • And so they've got the British kind of bottled up in town.
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  • And it's about this time that Congress goes,
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  • "You know, this might get really serious.
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  • "Maybe we need someone to lead our military forces."
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  • And so Congress votes to make George Washington
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  • the Commander in Chief of the Continental Forces.
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  • So Washington arrives here, he looks the situation over,
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  • and this is where he stays for those nine months
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  • in the Siege of Boston.
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  • And he says, "You know, I think we can help the situation."
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  • So he sends General Henry Knox out to get cannons
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  • they had previously captured at Fort Ticonderoga.
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  • They brought them back, they got them around the high places
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  • in Boston looking down at the British.
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  • And the British decide, "Oh, this is not a good situation.
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  • "We need to get outta here."
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  • So the British leave Boston.
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  • And it's at that time that Washington breaks camp here
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  • and he also leaves.
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  • But before they broke camp, before the British leave
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  • is when Phyllis Wheatley comes here.
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  • Yeah, and it's significant
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  • that not only is it shortly before Washington leaves,
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  • but the fact that they are bringing her in to do poetry,
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  • because this is a time in America where there is still
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  • a lot of division over the issue of slavery.
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  • And even though there are many fighting abolition,
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  • there's many still supporting slavery.
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  • So the fact that Washington says, "No, no, no,
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  • "I'm not interested in the fact that she was a former slave,
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  • "that doesn't matter.
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  • "She's an incredible poetess,
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  • "we want to bring her in to perform."
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  • So this is the very place where Phyllis Wheatley came
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  • and performed her poetry for George Washington.
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  • (light jazz music)
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  • Hi everyone, I'm down here in the WallBuilders Collection.
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  • And I have a really interesting and important artifact
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  • for y'all today.
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  • This right here are the poems of Phyllis Wheatley.
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  • It's in a 1802 edition.
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  • "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral."
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  • And as we go through I'm gonna read one in particular
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  • that really stands out.
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  • It's one of her most famous poems.
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  • And it's called "On Being Brought From Africa to America."
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  • 'Twas mercy brought me from my pagan land,
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  • taught my benighted soul to understand that there's a God,
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  • there's a Savior too.
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  • Once I redemption neither sought nor knew.
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  • Some view our fable race with scornful eye,
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  • their color is a diabolical die.
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  • Remember, Christians, Negros black as Cain may be refined
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  • and join the angelic train.
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  • So just an incredible perspective on how God works
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  • all things together for the good of those that love Him.
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  • And Phyllis Wheatley certainly loved Him.
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  • And she made sure to write poetry and to record that
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  • and spread it to everybody who would listen.
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  • (inspiring music)
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  • So Phyllis was able to meet with George Washington
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  • and his officers.
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  • And that was a momentous time.
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  • I mean, that is the beginning
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  • of the American War for Independence
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  • and she was there at that point in time.
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  • She continued to write poetry about great events like that.
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  • But she also wrote about other themes,
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  • including very spiritual themes.
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  • As a matter of fact, she wrote about her own faith.
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  • One of her famous poems was
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  • "On Being Brought From Africa to America."
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  • And in it she talked about how that she was brought
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  • from Africa to America,
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  • but when she got here she found out about God.
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  • She found out about Jesus.
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  • She became a Christian.
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  • And though slavery wasn't a good deal,
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  • the fact that she became a Christian over here
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  • was a good deal.
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  • She actually ends up getting baptized
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  • in the Old South Church.
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  • That's a really famous church.
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  • That's where Sam Adams and other patriots went.
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  • And she became one of the very first black Americans
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  • to be baptized in that church.
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  • Her spiritual journey really was a big deal.
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  • Well, and as she continued writing poetry,
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  • one of the unique things about it
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  • is she's written dozens of different poems.
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  • And people are promoting
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  • you need to have your poetry published,
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  • which she's kind of okay with the idea.
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  • The problem was there wasn't a publisher in America
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  • at the time who was willing to pick up this book.
  • 00:10:02.120 --> 00:10:05.020
  • She continued writing about other momentous subjects,
  • 00:10:05.020 --> 00:10:07.280
  • even though they said no book.
  • 00:10:07.280 --> 00:10:09.100
  • For example, when George Whitfield died in 1770,
  • 00:10:09.100 --> 00:10:12.030
  • that was a big deal.
  • 00:10:12.030 --> 00:10:13.160
  • Now, this is before the American War for Independence.
  • 00:10:13.160 --> 00:10:15.030
  • But George Whitfield had preached across America
  • 00:10:15.030 --> 00:10:16.290
  • for 34 years.
  • 00:10:16.290 --> 00:10:18.120
  • He was known in virtually every community.
  • 00:10:18.120 --> 00:10:20.150
  • Founding Fathers had really been inspired by him.
  • 00:10:20.150 --> 00:10:22.230
  • And Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson,
  • 00:10:22.230 --> 00:10:24.210
  • John Adams all wrote about the impact he had.
  • 00:10:24.210 --> 00:10:26.260
  • And so when he died that was the end of the national revival
  • 00:10:26.260 --> 00:10:29.250
  • called the First Great Awakening.
  • 00:10:29.250 --> 00:10:31.160
  • She wrote an elegy on him.
  • 00:10:31.160 --> 00:10:33.070
  • Not a eulogy.
  • 00:10:33.070 --> 00:10:34.140
  • A eulogy is what you do, say when someone dies.
  • 00:10:34.140 --> 00:10:36.190
  • But she wrote an elegy,
  • 00:10:36.190 --> 00:10:37.270
  • which is a funeral poem about George Whitfield.
  • 00:10:37.270 --> 00:10:40.230
  • It was received very well here and got distributed around.
  • 00:10:40.230 --> 00:10:43.210
  • As a matter of fact, it made it all the way across the sea
  • 00:10:43.210 --> 00:10:46.180
  • over to England into the hands
  • 00:10:46.180 --> 00:10:48.170
  • of the Countess of Huntingdon.
  • 00:10:48.170 --> 00:10:50.030
  • Now the Countess of Huntingdon was a very influential person
  • 00:10:50.030 --> 00:10:53.000
  • in the English Court over there,
  • 00:10:53.000 --> 00:10:54.140
  • really focused on Christian ministry.
  • 00:10:54.140 --> 00:10:56.210
  • And so she would publish works
  • 00:10:56.210 --> 00:10:58.030
  • by any Evangelical kind of person
  • 00:10:58.030 --> 00:11:00.070
  • trying to get the Gospel out there.
  • 00:11:00.070 --> 00:11:01.220
  • And so she saw this stuff that Phyllis Wheatley had done
  • 00:11:01.220 --> 00:11:04.000
  • and said, "This is really good, I think I can help her.
  • 00:11:04.000 --> 00:11:06.220
  • "I think I can publish this for her."
  • 00:11:06.220 --> 00:11:08.090
  • Well, fortunately Nathaniel Wheatley,
  • 00:11:08.090 --> 00:11:10.080
  • who was the son of the Wheatleys,
  • 00:11:10.080 --> 00:11:11.200
  • was going over to Europe and says,
  • 00:11:11.200 --> 00:11:12.280
  • "Let's just bring Phyllis with us."
  • 00:11:12.280 --> 00:11:14.090
  • So Phyllis goes with Nathaniel over,
  • 00:11:14.090 --> 00:11:16.050
  • and Phyllis actually is presented
  • 00:11:16.050 --> 00:11:17.200
  • before the Countess of Huntingdon.
  • 00:11:17.200 --> 00:11:19.050
  • Now, while she's there she does poetry, actually shows,
  • 00:11:19.050 --> 00:11:21.150
  • "I've got more than 33 of these poems that are done."
  • 00:11:21.150 --> 00:11:24.060
  • And so the Countess of Huntingdon says,
  • 00:11:24.060 --> 00:11:25.160
  • "We really need to make this a book."
  • 00:11:25.160 --> 00:11:27.000
  • Well, it was done in Europe and it did so well
  • 00:11:27.000 --> 00:11:29.120
  • there was actually seven different printings over in Europe.
  • 00:11:29.120 --> 00:11:31.270
  • It then was shipped to America.
  • 00:11:31.270 --> 00:11:33.180
  • People received it well in America.
  • 00:11:33.180 --> 00:11:35.010
  • Finally they begin doing reproductions
  • 00:11:35.010 --> 00:11:36.210
  • of this work in America.
  • 00:11:36.210 --> 00:11:38.020
  • But you're talking about now.
  • 00:11:38.020 --> 00:11:39.170
  • You still have a young girl who at the time
  • 00:11:39.170 --> 00:11:41.160
  • is still a slave girl
  • 00:11:41.160 --> 00:11:43.010
  • who was the first published black poetess in America,
  • 00:11:43.010 --> 00:11:45.270
  • which is phenomenal to think about.
  • 00:11:45.270 --> 00:11:47.280
  • Well, she then does come back to America.
  • 00:11:47.280 --> 00:11:50.120
  • When she gets back she actually is given her freedom,
  • 00:11:50.120 --> 00:11:52.270
  • which is awesome.
  • 00:11:52.270 --> 00:11:54.050
  • 'Cause now she's a published poetess,
  • 00:11:54.050 --> 00:11:55.210
  • she has her own book, she now has her freedom.
  • 00:11:55.210 --> 00:11:58.070
  • But freedom was a little more difficult for her
  • 00:11:58.070 --> 00:12:00.110
  • than we might imagine.
  • 00:12:00.110 --> 00:12:01.250
  • Yeah, the Wheatleys had really taken good care of her.
  • 00:12:01.250 --> 00:12:03.180
  • And they considered her and treated her like a daughter.
  • 00:12:03.180 --> 00:12:06.010
  • I mean, the things they did for her from education
  • 00:12:06.010 --> 00:12:07.270
  • to helping her get her book published.
  • 00:12:07.270 --> 00:12:09.110
  • And so they freed her
  • 00:12:09.110 --> 00:12:10.250
  • and they continued to provide economic support for her.
  • 00:12:10.250 --> 00:12:13.160
  • But not long after that both the Wheatleys died.
  • 00:12:13.160 --> 00:12:16.240
  • And so the really is on her own now.
  • 00:12:16.240 --> 00:12:18.260
  • And she was really not prepared
  • 00:12:18.260 --> 00:12:20.280
  • for a life outside of where she had been.
  • 00:12:20.280 --> 00:12:23.280
  • And so on the outside she's trying to make money
  • 00:12:23.280 --> 00:12:26.290
  • and get jobs.
  • 00:12:26.290 --> 00:12:28.150
  • And she has some money the Wheatleys have left them.
  • 00:12:28.150 --> 00:12:29.290
  • And she meets a guy named John Peters
  • 00:12:29.290 --> 00:12:32.000
  • and thinks she loves him and he says he loves her.
  • 00:12:32.000 --> 00:12:34.060
  • She ends up getting married to John Peters.
  • 00:12:34.060 --> 00:12:36.160
  • And he turns out to be a real scoundrel.
  • 00:12:36.160 --> 00:12:38.130
  • He took the money she had, he got them in debt,
  • 00:12:38.130 --> 00:12:41.020
  • he went into debtors' prison.
  • 00:12:41.020 --> 00:12:42.170
  • They had a couple of kids and both of them died young.
  • 00:12:42.170 --> 00:12:45.200
  • And she's pregnant again with the third kid
  • 00:12:45.200 --> 00:12:47.160
  • and he just abandons her, just leaves her.
  • 00:12:47.160 --> 00:12:49.160
  • And so she doesn't have income, she doesn't have money.
  • 00:12:49.160 --> 00:12:52.060
  • She's working, she becomes a charwoman
  • 00:12:52.060 --> 00:12:54.070
  • which means she does any kind of house labor, cleaning,
  • 00:12:54.070 --> 00:12:57.140
  • laundry, anything she can.
  • 00:12:57.140 --> 00:12:59.080
  • She's living in very, very dire poverty,
  • 00:12:59.080 --> 00:13:02.080
  • very difficult conditions.
  • 00:13:02.080 --> 00:13:04.110
  • And actually at the age of 31
  • 00:13:04.110 --> 00:13:06.270
  • she ends up dying in that dismal poverty.
  • 00:13:06.270 --> 00:13:10.010
  • And her third child, that infant child died
  • 00:13:10.010 --> 00:13:12.090
  • on the same day she did.
  • 00:13:12.090 --> 00:13:13.170
  • So it was a very tragic ending to her life.
  • 00:13:13.170 --> 00:13:16.010
  • And yet she accomplished so much
  • 00:13:16.010 --> 00:13:18.090
  • in the time that she was here.
  • 00:13:18.090 --> 00:13:19.180
  • In fact, one of the unique things about her,
  • 00:13:19.180 --> 00:13:21.030
  • even though her story was a tragic story
  • 00:13:21.030 --> 00:13:23.040
  • the way her life ended,
  • 00:13:23.040 --> 00:13:24.110
  • she broke the mold for much of America.
  • 00:13:24.110 --> 00:13:26.080
  • That's right.
  • 00:13:26.080 --> 00:13:27.140
  • In fact, leading up to the Civil War
  • 00:13:27.140 --> 00:13:28.200
  • the abolitionists used her as an example
  • 00:13:28.200 --> 00:13:30.050
  • when many people who were pro-slavery would argue,
  • 00:13:30.050 --> 00:13:32.160
  • "Wait a second, the blacks aren't as smart as the whites."
  • 00:13:32.160 --> 00:13:35.030
  • They would point to her
  • 00:13:35.030 --> 00:13:36.110
  • as one of the many examples they had.
  • 00:13:36.110 --> 00:13:37.280
  • She really was a leader for abolitionists in that movement
  • 00:13:37.280 --> 00:13:41.040
  • helping bring equality to America.
  • 00:13:41.040 --> 00:13:43.070
  • What's interesting is that after the Civil War
  • 00:13:43.070 --> 00:13:44.250
  • her story was largely lost for maybe nearly a hundred years.
  • 00:13:44.250 --> 00:13:48.080
  • And only recently people have begin
  • 00:13:48.080 --> 00:13:49.250
  • to rediscover her writings and a lot more about who she is.
  • 00:13:49.250 --> 00:13:52.160
  • But in the big scheme of things,
  • 00:13:52.160 --> 00:13:54.020
  • she is one of those forgotten heroes from American history,
  • 00:13:54.020 --> 00:13:57.140
  • although certainly someone like Phyllis Wheatley
  • 00:13:57.140 --> 00:13:59.170
  • should be remembered for breaking the mold.
  • 00:13:59.170 --> 00:14:01.210
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:14:01.210 --> 00:14:04.130
  • (electronic beeping)
  • 00:14:04.130 --> 00:14:07.150
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:14:11.280 --> 00:14:14.230
  • We're in Baltimore, Maryland,
  • 00:14:17.100 --> 00:14:18.180
  • standing in front of a Francis Scott Key
  • 00:14:18.180 --> 00:14:19.260
  • statue and memorial.
  • 00:14:19.260 --> 00:14:21.130
  • And you see it's fenced off,
  • 00:14:21.130 --> 00:14:22.290
  • and that's actually to protect it because Francis Scott Key,
  • 00:14:22.290 --> 00:14:25.130
  • even though most Americans have no idea who he is,
  • 00:14:25.130 --> 00:14:27.290
  • is someone that's kind of become
  • 00:14:27.290 --> 00:14:29.170
  • a villain in modern culture.
  • 00:14:29.170 --> 00:14:31.040
  • Now, what he's famous for
  • 00:14:31.040 --> 00:14:32.170
  • is being the author of "The Star-Spangled Banner."
  • 00:14:32.170 --> 00:14:34.150
  • That doesn't seem contentious, doesn't seem like a problem.
  • 00:14:34.150 --> 00:14:37.000
  • Except there's actually four verses.
  • 00:14:37.000 --> 00:14:39.140
  • Most Americans might recognize the first one.
  • 00:14:39.140 --> 00:14:42.080
  • They certainly don't know the second, third, or fourth.
  • 00:14:42.080 --> 00:14:43.280
  • In the third verse there's actually a line
  • 00:14:43.280 --> 00:14:45.180
  • where he mentions a slave.
  • 00:14:45.180 --> 00:14:47.030
  • And that's been so blown out of context and proportion
  • 00:14:47.030 --> 00:14:50.020
  • that people automatically think,
  • 00:14:50.020 --> 00:14:51.140
  • "Well, then he must have been a racist guy,
  • 00:14:51.140 --> 00:14:52.280
  • "therefore the anthem's bad, we shouldn't sing it."
  • 00:14:52.280 --> 00:14:54.270
  • The fact that people are accusing him of being a racist
  • 00:14:54.270 --> 00:14:57.000
  • is an incredible irony if you know any of history.
  • 00:14:57.000 --> 00:15:00.040
  • Yeah, Francis Scott Key was a very famous attorney.
  • 00:15:00.040 --> 00:15:03.010
  • And as an attorney we have record of him
  • 00:15:03.010 --> 00:15:05.050
  • being involved in 105 cases that somehow involved slavery,
  • 00:15:05.050 --> 00:15:08.230
  • some way, shape, fashion, or form.
  • 00:15:08.230 --> 00:15:10.170
  • And in 97 of those 105 cases
  • 00:15:10.170 --> 00:15:13.150
  • he took the side of the slave and argued against slavery.
  • 00:15:13.150 --> 00:15:17.010
  • He argued for freedom.
  • 00:15:17.010 --> 00:15:18.170
  • We can point to about 200 slaves that have their freedom
  • 00:15:18.170 --> 00:15:21.210
  • because of what Francis Scott Key did.
  • 00:15:21.210 --> 00:15:24.000
  • On top of that, he argued cases
  • 00:15:24.000 --> 00:15:25.220
  • in front of the U.S. Supreme Court,
  • 00:15:25.220 --> 00:15:27.000
  • and one of them was a very famous case
  • 00:15:27.000 --> 00:15:28.110
  • called The Antelope Case.
  • 00:15:28.110 --> 00:15:29.250
  • And that's the name of a ship that was carrying slaves,
  • 00:15:29.250 --> 00:15:32.150
  • a slave-trading ship.
  • 00:15:32.150 --> 00:15:33.290
  • And they were prosecuted and said you can't do that,
  • 00:15:33.290 --> 00:15:36.150
  • slave trade's been banned.
  • 00:15:36.150 --> 00:15:37.240
  • He went a long way in trying to fight slavery.
  • 00:15:37.240 --> 00:15:40.060
  • Matter of fact, he's personally responsible
  • 00:15:40.060 --> 00:15:42.120
  • for introducing a petition in Congress
  • 00:15:42.120 --> 00:15:44.120
  • for the abolition of the slave trade.
  • 00:15:44.120 --> 00:15:46.150
  • So for him somehow to be portrayed as racist today
  • 00:15:46.150 --> 00:15:50.020
  • is not a reflection of what history really was.
  • 00:15:50.020 --> 00:15:52.220
  • Now, there is some areas of his life you go,
  • 00:15:52.220 --> 00:15:54.280
  • "Okay, now wait a second.
  • 00:15:54.280 --> 00:15:55.260
  • "I'm not sure about that."
  • 00:15:55.260 --> 00:15:57.060
  • Actually, he did own slaves at times.
  • 00:15:57.060 --> 00:15:58.260
  • And then he actually does end up freeing slaves
  • 00:15:58.260 --> 00:16:00.230
  • in his lifetime.
  • 00:16:00.230 --> 00:16:02.050
  • And then the rest of his slaves were freed at his death.
  • 00:16:02.050 --> 00:16:03.110
  • And there actually is a newspaper
  • 00:16:03.110 --> 00:16:04.180
  • that does an article on Francis Scott Key.
  • 00:16:04.180 --> 00:16:06.100
  • And they say, "He's just an N Lawyer."
  • 00:16:06.100 --> 00:16:09.210
  • They said, "That's how we associate this guy."
  • 00:16:09.210 --> 00:16:11.270
  • Well, if your legacy for the people that know you
  • 00:16:11.270 --> 00:16:15.160
  • or the people that oppose you
  • 00:16:15.160 --> 00:16:17.000
  • is that you're always fighting to free the black man,
  • 00:16:17.000 --> 00:16:19.070
  • you're always fighting for the slave,
  • 00:16:19.070 --> 00:16:20.280
  • and they're gonna label you the N Lawyer,
  • 00:16:20.280 --> 00:16:22.240
  • that's pretty strong rhetoric.
  • 00:16:22.240 --> 00:16:24.160
  • The vast majority of his life
  • 00:16:24.160 --> 00:16:26.060
  • he is fighting on the right side
  • 00:16:26.060 --> 00:16:27.260
  • trying to do the right thing.
  • 00:16:27.260 --> 00:16:29.180
  • And yet today people think this one line
  • 00:16:29.180 --> 00:16:33.020
  • from the third verse of "The Star-Spangled Banner"
  • 00:16:33.020 --> 00:16:35.080
  • makes him a racist because it does mention the word slave.
  • 00:16:35.080 --> 00:16:38.080
  • The problem is we don't know the context
  • 00:16:38.080 --> 00:16:40.070
  • of why he was writing the song and what it's all about.
  • 00:16:40.070 --> 00:16:43.150
  • We probably should just go to Fort McHenry
  • 00:16:43.150 --> 00:16:45.040
  • and learn the rest of the story.
  • 00:16:45.040 --> 00:16:46.130
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:16:46.130 --> 00:16:49.080
  • (electronic beeping)
  • 00:16:51.240 --> 00:16:54.270
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:16:56.170 --> 00:16:59.120
  • (birds chirping)
  • 00:17:01.090 --> 00:17:04.020
  • We're at Fort McHenry.
  • 00:17:06.290 --> 00:17:08.120
  • Fort McHenry is named after James McHenry
  • 00:17:08.120 --> 00:17:10.240
  • who's a signer of the U.S. Constitution.
  • 00:17:10.240 --> 00:17:13.000
  • James was also a famous soldier
  • 00:17:13.000 --> 00:17:14.190
  • in the American War for Independence.
  • 00:17:14.190 --> 00:17:16.020
  • He actually was on the staff of George Washington.
  • 00:17:16.020 --> 00:17:18.020
  • He was an aide to George Washington.
  • 00:17:18.020 --> 00:17:20.100
  • After the war when the federal government gets established
  • 00:17:20.100 --> 00:17:22.230
  • and President Washington is our first president,
  • 00:17:22.230 --> 00:17:24.290
  • he chooses James McHenry to be his Secretary of War.
  • 00:17:24.290 --> 00:17:28.030
  • Now today we would call that the Secretary of Defense.
  • 00:17:28.030 --> 00:17:30.070
  • But back then it was the Secretary of War.
  • 00:17:30.070 --> 00:17:32.010
  • And then when John Adams becomes president
  • 00:17:32.010 --> 00:17:34.020
  • he keeps James McHenry on as the Secretary of War.
  • 00:17:34.020 --> 00:17:36.220
  • So he's a very famous soldier.
  • 00:17:36.220 --> 00:17:38.140
  • And this fort was named for him
  • 00:17:38.140 --> 00:17:40.090
  • as a signer of the Constitution.
  • 00:17:40.090 --> 00:17:41.290
  • This fort is located in a very strategic place.
  • 00:17:41.290 --> 00:17:44.150
  • This is the harbor in Baltimore
  • 00:17:44.150 --> 00:17:46.170
  • and anytime you're gonna be in a war,
  • 00:17:46.170 --> 00:17:48.060
  • any kind of invading nation coming with navies,
  • 00:17:48.060 --> 00:17:50.200
  • this is where they want to come,
  • 00:17:50.200 --> 00:17:51.230
  • to these ports along the coast.
  • 00:17:51.230 --> 00:17:53.090
  • In the War of 1812 the British did target Fort McHenry.
  • 00:17:53.090 --> 00:17:56.070
  • Except the British didn't go from here to D.C.,
  • 00:17:56.070 --> 00:17:59.000
  • they actually started in D.C. to get here.
  • 00:17:59.000 --> 00:18:01.140
  • Yeah, they went after the Capital.
  • 00:18:01.140 --> 00:18:02.230
  • And when they went after the Capital
  • 00:18:02.230 --> 00:18:04.060
  • they had 10.000 American troops to defend the Capital.
  • 00:18:04.060 --> 00:18:06.290
  • The British had 5.000 troops.
  • 00:18:06.290 --> 00:18:08.230
  • Should be an easy battle.
  • 00:18:08.230 --> 00:18:09.250
  • It wasn't.
  • 00:18:09.250 --> 00:18:10.230
  • The Americans turned and ran,
  • 00:18:10.230 --> 00:18:12.140
  • and without almost any opposition
  • 00:18:12.140 --> 00:18:15.020
  • the British get to march into Washington, D.C.
  • 00:18:15.020 --> 00:18:17.030
  • All the American troops are gone.
  • 00:18:17.030 --> 00:18:18.130
  • They burn the White House.
  • 00:18:18.130 --> 00:18:19.240
  • They burn the Capitol.
  • 00:18:19.240 --> 00:18:20.290
  • They burn other government buildings.
  • 00:18:20.290 --> 00:18:22.160
  • And now that they've taken Washington, D.C.,
  • 00:18:22.160 --> 00:18:24.070
  • they're coming here to Fort McHenry.
  • 00:18:24.070 --> 00:18:25.270
  • The commander here, Major George Armistead
  • 00:18:25.270 --> 00:18:28.070
  • knows the British are gonna get here at some point in time.
  • 00:18:28.070 --> 00:18:30.210
  • And he says, "And when they come
  • 00:18:30.210 --> 00:18:32.060
  • "I don't want them to get lost on their way here.
  • 00:18:32.060 --> 00:18:34.020
  • "I want them to know where they're going.
  • 00:18:34.020 --> 00:18:35.160
  • "So I'm gonna have a really big American flag made."
  • 00:18:35.160 --> 00:18:38.260
  • So he went to Mary Pickersgill who's a famous flag maker
  • 00:18:38.260 --> 00:18:41.180
  • and he had her make two American flags.
  • 00:18:41.180 --> 00:18:43.050
  • One's called a storm flag that they would fly in storms.
  • 00:18:43.050 --> 00:18:45.220
  • That's the size of the one that's flying now.
  • 00:18:45.220 --> 00:18:47.260
  • But he wanted a giant flag made
  • 00:18:47.260 --> 00:18:49.240
  • to make sure the British could see it.
  • 00:18:49.240 --> 00:18:51.030
  • And that one was 30 feet high and 42 feet wide.
  • 00:18:51.030 --> 00:18:53.280
  • And that becomes actually the center
  • 00:18:53.280 --> 00:18:55.290
  • of "The Star-Spangled Banner" story.
  • 00:18:55.290 --> 00:18:57.150
  • And that's actually the flag on the Smithsonian
  • 00:18:57.150 --> 00:18:59.070
  • if you ever go to Washington, D.C.,
  • 00:18:59.070 --> 00:19:00.080
  • you can see that flag there.
  • 00:19:00.080 --> 00:19:02.010
  • So as the British were marching from D.C.
  • 00:19:02.010 --> 00:19:03.160
  • they actually are capturing many Americans along the way,
  • 00:19:03.160 --> 00:19:05.270
  • taking lots of prisoners of war.
  • 00:19:05.270 --> 00:19:07.190
  • There was a guy who was in charge of the negotiation process
  • 00:19:07.190 --> 00:19:10.160
  • for American prisoners of war.
  • 00:19:10.160 --> 00:19:11.280
  • And as he's going he realized,
  • 00:19:11.280 --> 00:19:13.120
  • "I want to take somebody with me.
  • 00:19:13.120 --> 00:19:14.260
  • "Maybe I need some help on this."
  • 00:19:14.260 --> 00:19:16.120
  • So Francis Scott Key joins, they end up meeting the British,
  • 00:19:16.120 --> 00:19:19.110
  • they get on the ship, they're sailing out,
  • 00:19:19.110 --> 00:19:21.060
  • and they're working on this negotiation.
  • 00:19:21.060 --> 00:19:23.080
  • And they think it's going well,
  • 00:19:23.080 --> 00:19:24.270
  • except it's not quite what they had planned.
  • 00:19:24.270 --> 00:19:27.060
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:19:27.060 --> 00:19:30.010
  • The British are about to start the bombardment
  • 00:19:31.230 --> 00:19:33.120
  • of Fort McHenry which is directly behind us.
  • 00:19:33.120 --> 00:19:35.240
  • Now, Francis Scott Key's position
  • 00:19:35.240 --> 00:19:37.140
  • is about eight miles from here on a ship.
  • 00:19:37.140 --> 00:19:39.260
  • So he's not even really seeing the fort
  • 00:19:39.260 --> 00:19:41.230
  • like we might see the fort today.
  • 00:19:41.230 --> 00:19:43.130
  • However, throughout the night
  • 00:19:43.130 --> 00:19:44.290
  • he does see these bombs bursting in air as it was.
  • 00:19:44.290 --> 00:19:47.160
  • The next morning as he gets up, it has gone silent.
  • 00:19:47.160 --> 00:19:50.260
  • So the bombing is no longer there.
  • 00:19:50.260 --> 00:19:52.180
  • So one side or the other has stopped this thing.
  • 00:19:52.180 --> 00:19:55.100
  • And so he grabs a spyglass,
  • 00:19:55.100 --> 00:19:57.040
  • he crawls up on the side of the ship, he looks.
  • 00:19:57.040 --> 00:19:59.220
  • And he sees the big flag flying.
  • 00:19:59.220 --> 00:20:02.000
  • And at that point in time all the emotions came out.
  • 00:20:02.000 --> 00:20:04.180
  • We haven't lost, we still are standing here,
  • 00:20:04.180 --> 00:20:06.250
  • we'll be able to continue the fight, we've not surrendered.
  • 00:20:06.250 --> 00:20:09.020
  • He begins to jot down his thoughts.
  • 00:20:09.020 --> 00:20:10.200
  • Four verses about what he's seen and what he's experienced,
  • 00:20:10.200 --> 00:20:13.110
  • what he's felt.
  • 00:20:13.110 --> 00:20:14.270
  • So with "The Star-Spangled Banner" it's kind of fun,
  • 00:20:14.270 --> 00:20:16.240
  • once you know the story,
  • 00:20:16.240 --> 00:20:18.010
  • to go back and think about the first verse.
  • 00:20:18.010 --> 00:20:21.010
  • - [Tim] If you think about the actual words to the song
  • 00:20:21.010 --> 00:20:22.270
  • in context it makes so much sense
  • 00:20:22.270 --> 00:20:24.230
  • considering what he had seen. ("The Star-Spangled Banner")
  • 00:20:24.230 --> 00:20:26.090
  • O say can you see, by the dawn's early light,
  • 00:20:26.090 --> 00:20:29.130
  • what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming.
  • 00:20:29.130 --> 00:20:32.130
  • It's like, "Hey fellas, can you see?
  • 00:20:32.130 --> 00:20:34.130
  • "I mean, when we went to bed last night
  • 00:20:34.130 --> 00:20:36.000
  • "we couldn't see what was happening.
  • 00:20:36.000 --> 00:20:37.220
  • "We saw all this going on.
  • 00:20:37.220 --> 00:20:39.040
  • "But it's still there.
  • 00:20:39.040 --> 00:20:40.110
  • "We can see it by the dawn's early light."
  • 00:20:40.110 --> 00:20:41.290
  • And explaining it, right?
  • 00:20:41.290 --> 00:20:43.050
  • If you think about the next line,
  • 00:20:43.050 --> 00:20:44.110
  • whose broad stripes and bright stars
  • 00:20:44.110 --> 00:20:45.270
  • through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched
  • 00:20:45.270 --> 00:20:48.260
  • were so gallantly streaming?
  • 00:20:48.260 --> 00:20:50.270
  • Describing the fight, right?
  • 00:20:50.270 --> 00:20:51.270
  • Yeah, it is.
  • 00:20:51.270 --> 00:20:53.140
  • Because, I mean, he looks for it, he's got the spyglass on,
  • 00:20:53.140 --> 00:20:55.160
  • he sees it, "Hey, the stars and stripes,
  • 00:20:55.160 --> 00:20:57.120
  • "they're still there.
  • 00:20:57.120 --> 00:20:58.270
  • "We've been watching all night through the perilous fight
  • 00:20:58.270 --> 00:21:00.080
  • "and they're still there."
  • 00:21:00.080 --> 00:21:01.160
  • - [Tim] Yeah, and then he goes on,
  • 00:21:01.160 --> 00:21:03.020
  • and the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
  • 00:21:03.020 --> 00:21:04.270
  • gave proof through the night that the flag was still there.
  • 00:21:04.270 --> 00:21:08.150
  • The rocket's red glare, I mean,
  • 00:21:08.150 --> 00:21:10.080
  • when they launched them off the rafts and off the ship
  • 00:21:10.080 --> 00:21:12.090
  • you could see the trail coming in
  • 00:21:12.090 --> 00:21:14.020
  • and trying to set things on fire inside.
  • 00:21:14.020 --> 00:21:15.120
  • And the bombs bursting in air,
  • 00:21:15.120 --> 00:21:17.060
  • those were mortars up to 200 pounds
  • 00:21:17.060 --> 00:21:19.000
  • that they were setting over the top of the fort
  • 00:21:19.000 --> 00:21:20.250
  • and they'd blow up over the top
  • 00:21:20.250 --> 00:21:22.000
  • and try to get shrapnel down.
  • 00:21:22.000 --> 00:21:23.060
  • All night long we saw it,
  • 00:21:23.060 --> 00:21:24.120
  • so we know the fort's still standing,
  • 00:21:24.120 --> 00:21:25.270
  • they haven't surrendered yet.
  • 00:21:25.270 --> 00:21:26.260
  • And giving affirmation,
  • 00:21:26.260 --> 00:21:28.120
  • O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
  • 00:21:28.120 --> 00:21:31.100
  • o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?
  • 00:21:31.100 --> 00:21:35.150
  • Acknowledging that this thing is still going on
  • 00:21:35.150 --> 00:21:37.170
  • and we still have pride in this nation.
  • 00:21:37.170 --> 00:21:39.280
  • It really is a neat statement,
  • 00:21:39.280 --> 00:21:41.050
  • and actually over the next several verses
  • 00:21:41.050 --> 00:21:42.220
  • he even unfolds more of the story,
  • 00:21:42.220 --> 00:21:44.070
  • which, if you haven't read all four verses,
  • 00:21:44.070 --> 00:21:45.190
  • go read all four verses.
  • 00:21:45.190 --> 00:21:47.080
  • It's actually from that fourth verse
  • 00:21:47.080 --> 00:21:48.240
  • where many believe that we get our national motto
  • 00:21:48.240 --> 00:21:50.250
  • In God We Trust because he says,
  • 00:21:50.250 --> 00:21:52.250
  • "This be our motto, in God is our trust."
  • 00:21:52.250 --> 00:21:55.230
  • And what you'll notice if you read all the verses
  • 00:21:55.230 --> 00:21:57.070
  • in the third verse it does mention
  • 00:21:57.070 --> 00:21:59.100
  • what he largely had seen on British ships
  • 00:21:59.100 --> 00:22:01.190
  • which were the British oftentimes would capture Americans
  • 00:22:01.190 --> 00:22:04.150
  • and they would impress them, force them into action.
  • 00:22:04.150 --> 00:22:06.240
  • And this is what they called the hireling and the slave
  • 00:22:06.240 --> 00:22:09.020
  • is what Francis Scott Key is referencing in that third verse
  • 00:22:09.020 --> 00:22:11.190
  • is that actually he's seeing Americans being imprisoned.
  • 00:22:11.190 --> 00:22:14.060
  • So it wasn't even a reference
  • 00:22:14.060 --> 00:22:15.280
  • to a racial kind of imprisonment
  • 00:22:15.280 --> 00:22:17.100
  • as much as it was one nation to another nation
  • 00:22:17.100 --> 00:22:19.210
  • in this regard.
  • 00:22:19.210 --> 00:22:21.050
  • But if you read all four verses you get a beautiful picture
  • 00:22:21.050 --> 00:22:23.010
  • of what's going on, his sentiment, emotion the next morning.
  • 00:22:23.010 --> 00:22:26.040
  • It really is pretty telling for what he felt.
  • 00:22:26.040 --> 00:22:28.020
  • (light jazz music)
  • 00:22:28.020 --> 00:22:31.000
  • So I'm down here in the WallBuilders Collection.
  • 00:22:35.260 --> 00:22:38.040
  • And I was able to dig up some really cool artifacts
  • 00:22:38.040 --> 00:22:40.160
  • about Francis Scott Key.
  • 00:22:40.160 --> 00:22:42.070
  • And I actually have one of his legal briefs right here.
  • 00:22:42.070 --> 00:22:44.240
  • So this is one that he wrote,
  • 00:22:44.240 --> 00:22:46.120
  • talks about going before the Supreme Court.
  • 00:22:46.120 --> 00:22:48.190
  • And it lays out really his plan of attack.
  • 00:22:48.190 --> 00:22:51.150
  • He held these pages, wrote with it in his own hand.
  • 00:22:51.150 --> 00:22:54.260
  • And I've also got right here "The Star-Spangled Banner."
  • 00:22:54.260 --> 00:22:57.040
  • So we've got it, the original name right here,
  • 00:22:57.040 --> 00:22:58.290
  • "The Defense of Fort McHenry."
  • 00:22:58.290 --> 00:23:01.120
  • So this is the very first original printing
  • 00:23:01.120 --> 00:23:04.050
  • of what would later become our national anthem.
  • 00:23:04.050 --> 00:23:06.100
  • But I've also got an entire volume of his poems.
  • 00:23:06.100 --> 00:23:09.190
  • A lot of them about his faith.
  • 00:23:09.190 --> 00:23:11.090
  • So I've actually got it opened up right here
  • 00:23:11.090 --> 00:23:13.120
  • to one about prayer, about why you should pray,
  • 00:23:13.120 --> 00:23:15.250
  • about what the effects of prayer are.
  • 00:23:15.250 --> 00:23:17.180
  • So really deep, really interesting, you know,
  • 00:23:17.180 --> 00:23:20.010
  • poems about Christ, poems about all sorts of aspects
  • 00:23:20.010 --> 00:23:23.120
  • of his Christian life
  • 00:23:23.120 --> 00:23:24.190
  • because that was such an important
  • 00:23:24.190 --> 00:23:25.250
  • and significant aspect of his life.
  • 00:23:25.250 --> 00:23:28.120
  • So we've got a lot of interesting artifacts
  • 00:23:28.120 --> 00:23:30.180
  • from Francis Scott Key here in the WallBuilders Collection.
  • 00:23:30.180 --> 00:23:33.160
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:23:33.160 --> 00:23:36.110
  • (electronic beeping)
  • 00:23:39.060 --> 00:23:42.090
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:23:43.140 --> 00:23:46.090
  • We're in Georgetown just outside of Washington, D.C.,
  • 00:23:49.040 --> 00:23:51.060
  • at the Francis Scott Key Memorial.
  • 00:23:51.060 --> 00:23:52.230
  • And we've talked about Francis Scott Key as an attorney,
  • 00:23:52.230 --> 00:23:55.190
  • as someone who did "The Star-Spangled Banner."
  • 00:23:55.190 --> 00:23:57.110
  • We've talked about his positions on slavery.
  • 00:23:57.110 --> 00:23:59.130
  • But really a lot of his life's centered
  • 00:23:59.130 --> 00:24:00.230
  • right here in Georgetown.
  • 00:24:00.230 --> 00:24:02.060
  • And in his life he was always a very strong Christian.
  • 00:24:02.060 --> 00:24:05.130
  • He couldn't decide whether he wanted to be an attorney
  • 00:24:05.130 --> 00:24:07.160
  • or a minister.
  • 00:24:07.160 --> 00:24:08.140
  • He was that split over it.
  • 00:24:08.140 --> 00:24:09.120
  • So he chose to be an attorney,
  • 00:24:09.120 --> 00:24:11.060
  • but the ministry side was really strong.
  • 00:24:11.060 --> 00:24:12.270
  • He actually helped start two seminaries.
  • 00:24:12.270 --> 00:24:14.290
  • He was one of the managers of the American Bible Society.
  • 00:24:14.290 --> 00:24:18.070
  • Yeah, there really are so many things in his life
  • 00:24:18.070 --> 00:24:19.170
  • that we can look back and celebrate.
  • 00:24:19.170 --> 00:24:21.040
  • Obviously his faith is something
  • 00:24:21.040 --> 00:24:22.240
  • that was so central in everything he did.
  • 00:24:22.240 --> 00:24:25.030
  • Well, we also can look and see he was someone
  • 00:24:25.030 --> 00:24:26.180
  • who fought against slavery much of his life,
  • 00:24:26.180 --> 00:24:28.090
  • who actually wanted to see slavery ended in America,
  • 00:24:28.090 --> 00:24:30.130
  • see the total emancipation of all the slaves.
  • 00:24:30.130 --> 00:24:33.000
  • And so as we look at his life,
  • 00:24:33.000 --> 00:24:34.150
  • a lot of people today still think of him as a villain.
  • 00:24:34.150 --> 00:24:35.290
  • And sadly, the only reason they think of him as a villain
  • 00:24:35.290 --> 00:24:37.210
  • is because they don't really know his story.
  • 00:24:37.210 --> 00:24:39.210
  • But that's why we're doing what we do
  • 00:24:39.210 --> 00:24:41.050
  • is 'cause we want people to know some of these hidden heroes
  • 00:24:41.050 --> 00:24:43.130
  • from American history.
  • 00:24:43.130 --> 00:24:44.170
  • (gentle guitar music)
  • 00:24:44.170 --> 00:24:47.220
  • What's striking to me about
  • 00:24:52.070 --> 00:24:53.210
  • both the story of Francis Scott Key and Phyllis Wheatley
  • 00:24:53.210 --> 00:24:55.200
  • is if we were to tell them not in the sense
  • 00:24:55.200 --> 00:24:58.260
  • of how things happened but in a modern narrative,
  • 00:24:58.260 --> 00:25:02.040
  • Francis Scott Key's a racist
  • 00:25:02.040 --> 00:25:03.100
  • and Phyllis Wheatley's a victim.
  • 00:25:03.100 --> 00:25:05.030
  • And yet, when you look at their story,
  • 00:25:05.030 --> 00:25:06.180
  • they're the furthest thing from that.
  • 00:25:06.180 --> 00:25:08.030
  • And this is one of those mentalities
  • 00:25:08.030 --> 00:25:09.230
  • that so often we look back at heroes
  • 00:25:09.230 --> 00:25:12.130
  • that did significant things.
  • 00:25:12.130 --> 00:25:14.040
  • They didn't view themselves as being amazing,
  • 00:25:14.040 --> 00:25:17.070
  • and they didn't view themselves as being victims.
  • 00:25:17.070 --> 00:25:20.000
  • They were just living their life.
  • 00:25:20.000 --> 00:25:21.220
  • But you see the values of culture
  • 00:25:21.220 --> 00:25:23.270
  • that shape so much of what they did.
  • 00:25:23.270 --> 00:25:25.070
  • When you look at Francis Scott Key
  • 00:25:25.070 --> 00:25:26.140
  • and the reason he does so much of what he does,
  • 00:25:26.140 --> 00:25:28.220
  • was 'cause of a value system
  • 00:25:28.220 --> 00:25:30.070
  • that believes in the value of individuals and human life.
  • 00:25:30.070 --> 00:25:34.100
  • And so even though today people want to argue,
  • 00:25:34.100 --> 00:25:37.060
  • but he didn't always to do everything right.
  • 00:25:37.060 --> 00:25:39.110
  • Well, how silly is that?
  • 00:25:39.110 --> 00:25:41.010
  • He must have been human.
  • 00:25:41.010 --> 00:25:42.080
  • But how silly that our modern standard
  • 00:25:42.080 --> 00:25:43.280
  • is if you want perfect
  • 00:25:43.280 --> 00:25:46.050
  • then we're gonna emphasize your imperfections
  • 00:25:46.050 --> 00:25:49.270
  • instead of going, wait a second,
  • 00:25:49.270 --> 00:25:51.150
  • can God use imperfect people to do great things?
  • 00:25:51.150 --> 00:25:53.240
  • If yes, He can, then what did you do that was significant?
  • 00:25:53.240 --> 00:25:57.080
  • And there's no doubt the impact of Francis Scott Key
  • 00:25:57.080 --> 00:26:01.050
  • was something significant for us
  • 00:26:01.050 --> 00:26:02.200
  • as we still to this day will sing the anthem that he wrote.
  • 00:26:02.200 --> 00:26:05.260
  • Phyllis Wheatley is also a great example
  • 00:26:05.260 --> 00:26:07.160
  • of what can be the American dream.
  • 00:26:07.160 --> 00:26:09.160
  • And what she accomplished is incredibly significant,
  • 00:26:09.160 --> 00:26:12.120
  • and knowing where she came from
  • 00:26:12.120 --> 00:26:13.260
  • and what she experienced and what she must have seen.
  • 00:26:13.260 --> 00:26:16.080
  • But coming to a land where there's freedom and opportunity.
  • 00:26:16.080 --> 00:26:18.220
  • There's no limit to what you can accomplish,
  • 00:26:18.220 --> 00:26:20.290
  • and she is a great example of the American dream.
  • 00:26:20.290 --> 00:26:23.060
  • (inspiring music)
  • 00:26:23.060 --> 00:26:26.010
  • (electronic beeping)
  • 00:26:28.020 --> 00:26:30.030
  • - [Narrator] We hope you're enjoying TBN's exclusive series
  • 00:26:30.030 --> 00:26:32.200
  • America's Hidden History.
  • 00:26:32.200 --> 00:26:34.150
  • Thrilling stories of ordinary and unsung Americans
  • 00:26:34.150 --> 00:26:37.160
  • whom God used in extraordinary ways to shape our nation.
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  • Right now we want to send you the entire first season
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  • of America's Hidden History as our way of saying thank you
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